Democracy – The long and often bloody fight for freedom – The Peterloo Massacre.

Democracy – The long and often bloody fight for freedom – The Peterloo Massacre.

Peterloo massacre
You can only have real democracy when you have transparency, fair representation and a vote for every man and woman. That was far from the case two hundred years ago.
Women were denied the vote. Only landowners could vote. Some towns with only a handful of voters were electing two MPs. Two towns electing two MPs each had only 1 eligible voter. Half of the MPs in the House were elected by a mere 154 votes. Cities with hundreds of thousands were grossly underrepresented.
The economic and employment situation in the North was dire and people felt they had no recourse to justice. They had no vote and no representation.
At St. Peter’s field near Manchester between 60,000 and 80,000 gathered to hold a peaceful public meeting and protest. The establishment was rattled. They thought it might develop into a riot, ferment general unrest and lead to a revolution. They banned it. But the protesters still met.
The cavalry were called to charge. People were trampled and slashed with sabres. The crowd was eventually dispersed. They left 11 to 15 dead and over 600 to 700 badly injured – 168 of which were women. The first to be killed was a baby knocked out of his mother’s arms by a charging cavalryman. Witnesses claimed the cavalrymen slashed out indiscriminately at anyone they could. The area was sodden with blood.
It became known as the Peterloo massacre in ironic contrast to the recent battle of Waterloo.

It led to renewed impetus for justice and the Chartist Movement who fought for the right to vote.

Freedoms and rights are not freely given. They are paid for with lives and blood and can so easily be stripped away again.

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3 thoughts on “Democracy – The long and often bloody fight for freedom – The Peterloo Massacre.

  1. It’s been a long time since I studied English History – and I had forgotten about the Peterloo Massacre and the ridiculous Parliamentary rules about voting and representation that sparked the protest. A very apt illustration of why voters today who cannot be bothered to exercise their franchise, should be penalized. I’m appalled when I see voter turnouts of 60% or 70%. Thanks for the lesson, Opher.

    • Voting is mandatory in Australia. Perhaps it should be here too? But I think ignorance and complacency are the key factors. Our electorate are stupid and taken in by the tabloid press with their scare tactics.

      • Your last sentence is discriminately risible.
        As often the case with those with a superiority complex, their complacency of expression is ignorant of the facts.

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